About The Armory

The game plan
The Animal Rights movement is part of the political Left. The struggle for animal protection and animal rights is no different than the historical struggles to secure the rights and freedoms for minorities and the oppressed. The fight against speciesism is a continuation of the fight against racism, bigotry, hatred, and oppression of the weak.

The Armory of the Revolution is designed to be a source of philosophical and historical information for animal activists, and a resource for political and organizational strategies to broaden and grow the movement and expand its influence.

The guy
I’m an animal rights activist, an environmentalist, and a civil libertarian, all of which puts me on the political Left. Now on my fifth career (I was a stockbroker, investment banker, lawyer and Democratic strategist), I run progressive social issue campaigns.

As a Democratic political strategist, I ran presidential campaigns in California and the West for 2 sitting presidents and 3 presidential aspirants. I also directed California’s Proposition 13 campaign for Howard Jarvis.

I am brazenly anti-military. I was thrown out of the Cub Scouts for refusing to wear matching pants. I’ve never been good at following orders or obeying superiors. I’m a child of the 60s.

Curiously, however, I couch most of my activism in military concepts.
I don’t think in terms of an army, I think in terms of a guerilla.
A band of guerillas, actually.
Guerilla warfare is what we do.
Not with guns or weapons, but with ideas, organization, sound bites, demos, and ALF raids.
The weapon I am most proficient with is the written word.
I have an armory full of that particular weapon which I will be posting here.
Heavy artillery, grenades, tanks, bazookas! Ready for combat.
You just need to go there and pick up your supplies.
They don’t do any good just sitting in inventory.
They need to be read and shared!

Bombs Away!

10 thoughts on “About The Armory

  1. I couldn’t agree more. I saw Mr. Francione in an interview with Michael Smerconish a few months ago discussing a stray cat that a man called over to him and then sent flying with a kick. I was really disappointed. First of all, Mr. Smerconish suggested that if the perpetrator had kicked a human being, it would not have been a big deal and that he might not even have been charged. Who knows. Was that point important to the discussion? Then Mr. Francione suggested that we are “morally schizophrenic” when it comes to animals and kill millions in the food industry simply because “they taste good.” Thus nonvegans were hypocrites for complaining about the cat’s abuse. He went on to surmise that there was “race mongering” going on among those calling for punishment because the man who kicked the cat was African American. Smerconish and Francione also noted that animals were legally property/chattel. Thus a stray cat would not have been worth anything to anyone. What got lost in the whole conversation was what happened to the poor cat and what punishment would have been appropriate for the abuser.

    I assume many of the comments I see on animal abuse sites are from Mr. Francione’s followers. No matter what the particular abuse being discussed, those commenting suggest that unless people are vegan, they have no right no complain. Now, I have been an ethical vegan for 30 years, and I wish all people were for the sake of animals. But I also am grateful when people condemn any abuse of animals. If they are against fur, good! If they are against animal testing, good! If they work for homeless pets and spay and neuter programs, good! If they fight for farmed animals, good! It is counterproductive to demean people for caring about particular types of cruelty just because they do not adhere to rigid vegan puritanism.

    I’m also thinking that “abolitionism” is a part of the intersectionality movement. Again, that does not seem to be a friend of animals. In the discussions I have seen, the debate about animal cruelty gets diluted with just about every other “ism” being fought. Much of it involves trying not to offend human beings by infringing on their rhetorical territory. The author of Eternal Treblinka, Charles Patterson, has been criticized for comparing animals to the Jews and the Holocaust when describing the billions of animals being relentlessly and methodically killed. The author of The Dreaded Comparison, Marjorie Spiegel, has been criticized for comparing animals to slaves, never mind that the justifications for the abuse of humans then and the continued abuse animals are similar. The words “slavery” and “Holocaust” are virtually copyrighted and cannot be applied to nonhuman animal injustice. Now people are being castigated for saving that “all lives matter” or that “lions’ lives matter.” Unfortunately, it can be hard to have a discussion of the terrible abuse of animals using what seem to be apt comparisons without unintentionally offending someone’s sensibilities.

    For myself. I believe we can focus solely on animal rights issues without having to apologize to anyone and without straying off the topic to include every possible “ism” to prove our inclusiveness. Pulling all injustices into the discussion takes attention away from our specific concerns for animals in a world when there are thousands of organizations and advocates already active for human beings. No one has unlimited time, energy, or resources. We should be allowed to choose our battles to fight them well.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. I too am an animal rights advocate. Since the horrible death of Cecil the lion who was slaughtered by Walter James Palmer who botched his shot with a crossbow which resulted in a 40 hour drawn out and excruciating wait for the same coward to finally end the suffering and who then decapitated him, skinned him and left his ruined body to rot in the sun, my focus has been on trophy hunting, and the need to ban the practice forever. With that in mind, the only way that I see possible for all of the abuses against the nonhumans who share the planet with us is grassroots activism. I know the power of a people united against an oppressor. I am challenged by how to pursue the kind of unity needed in a society that communicates through electronic media. I intend to follow your blog in the hopes that there will be some help in that regard in your armory of weapons. Lock and Load.

    Liked by 1 person

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